First PhD defended!

Zhaoen Su (PhD 2017) is the first member of our group. Literally, he started in the summer of 2012 before I arrived to Pittsburgh. Together with others from the first cohort he built our research program from scratch – an empty room for a lab, and no cleanroom process for device fabrication.

Zhaoen first focused on Ge/Si nanowire devices. Through hard work he made great progress and achieved supercurrents and tunable double quantum dots. Facing an uphill battle with charge instabilities, he decided to transpose his project to InSb wires. He got excited about quantum dots coupled to superconducting contacts and realized Andreev molecules, which we have already written up. As Zhaoen begins his new position in the Bay Area, there are still 2 exciting experiments that he has performed waiting to be published.

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You can see him holding a mini Cathedral of Learning in the gif above. Congratulations, Zhaoen, and good luck in Silicon Valley!

Quantum Computing for Nerds From Other Fields

Here are videos from the Quantum Computing Session at the Frontiers of Science Symposium organized by NAS last year. This event brings together young researchers from all fields of study to explain to each other what they are working on. So, if you are a quantum physicist, you will not learn from these videos. If you are my grandmother, same – unless you are my grandmother with a PhD. If you are a biologist, an astrophysicist or a historian – these vidoes may be interesting for you.

Quantum Computing – Krysta Svore, Microsoft Research from Kavli Frontiers of Science on Vimeo.

Quantum Computing – Sergey Frolov, University of Pittsburgh from Kavli Frontiers of Science on Vimeo.

Quantum Computing – Aram W. Harrow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology from Kavli Frontiers of Science on Vimeo.

Thanks to Emanuel Gull and Daniela Oliveira for organizing the session.

Postdoc positions available in Frolov lab

Postdoctoral position in experiment quantum nanoscience is available at Frolov lab at the University of Pittsburgh. Research topics include but are not limited to non-Abelian statistics and topological qubits with Majorana fermions; interacting topological phases and work towards the discovery of parafermions; quantum simulation with semiconductor nanostructures such as quantum dots in nanowires. Typical projects involve a collaboration with a graduate student, extensive use of on-campus facilities at Petersen Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, and low temperature transport measurements in dilution refrigerators. Interested candidates should email their CV and describe their interests in an email to frolovsm@pitt.edu.

https://frolovlab.org/

New Trends in Trending

Today Nature Publishing House has announced the creation of a new and long overdue journal dedicated to publishing the ‘most hottest’ high impact research. The new magazine, called ‘New Trends in Trending’ is dedicated to publishing results that would not have been otherwise published in any other journal for at least five years into the future. Alongside this so-called ‘hyper-original research’, the new monthly will feature a horoscope, and comes with a lottery to win an Island off the coast of Kamchatka.

“Our aim is the impact factor of 1000” wrote Chief Editor Dr. Quickley R. Lookthrough in his first editorial “and our market study tells us this is how we get there”.

Manuscript submission guidelines require that along with the scientific title of each submitted manscript, the authors provide a ‘clickbait’ version of the title ‘to facilitate the broadest dissemination of to the most general audience possible’. A ‘clickbait’ title is meant to convey the premise of the work, but leave the conclusion concealed such that the reader is encouraged to click on the link to find out more. In order to assist the authors, the following clickbait title examples are provided:

They were measuring a graphene device, and then THIS happened!

Thirty-two line plots with error bars that will blow your mind. (You won’t believe the number seventeen!)

Two electrons did whaaat?

If you are doing science and you are older than 3 and younger than 98 you are in for a big surprise

Jaw-dropping discovery hits the field of dissipative porous multiphase systems like a hurricane

These quantum systems thought nobody was watching…

Why this new scaling theory is breaking the internet

Experimentalists feel stupid for not doing these measurements

Don’t read this if you DO NOT want a Nobel Prize

Group website

Sometime during the first year of our group I asked one of my graduate students to put together a group website. “Let’s first finish our first paper” he replied. This attitude shows how seriously we take websites. Not just anything deserves to have a website. Only things of staggering beautymind-blowing webdesign or the friendliest user interface can be websites. Still,

https://frolovlab.org/

Now that our group has fired out the first series of papers, and even though the papers are still painfully making their way through the antiquated journal system, it is time to unveil a modest yet informative little website.

As a side effect, since this blog no longer represents our whole group my hands are now officially untied, and I can proclaim the most ridiculous thoughts here.

First paper finished

High critical magnetic field superconducting contacts to Ge/Si core/shell nanowires

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My group has crossed an important milestone today – we have finalized and uploaded to arxiv our first publication. We are working on several of them simultaneously, and by the luck of the draw the first one out is a paper in which we share our experience making a particular type of nanowire superconducting.

The one and only good thing about writing papers is that it stimulates the authors to think about the experiment they have done in a special way: to find explanations for strange values and effects that only come forward when you give it that extra careful look. That tenth reading that you do under duress of scientific correctness. When we transition into the era of open science, we will share all our results on the fly, and look like fools for all our misconceptions and mistakes, but we will correct each other and move forward much faster. We will parallelize our intellects to think about each other’s work and won’t need to read the same text over and over again not to miss an embarassing mistake.

For now we just keep writing papers.